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(Response Paper) Laura Mulvey: The Women as Element of Spectacle in the Patriarchal Order

In response to: The Laura Mulvey essay “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema” from the journal “Screen” A response paper for my Advanced Film Theory and Criticism class In the essay “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema,” feminist film theorist Laura Mulvey objectively examined the roots of woman’s oppression in cinema using the socially established interpretation of sexual difference which controls images, including the erotic ways of looking at spectacle, as applied in films. She looked into the language of patriarchy using the tools provided by psychoanalysis, offering

(Response Paper) Elizabeth Spelman: Centuries of a Woman’s Body as a Gift and as a Curse

In response to: The Elizabeth Spelman essay “Woman as Body: Ancient Contemporary Views” from the journal “Feminist Studies” A response paper for my Advanced Film Theory and Criticism class I find philosopher Elizabeth Spelman’s “Woman as Body: Ancient Contemporary Views” as an eye-opening essay. It helped me better understand the oppression of women through the centuries, while making me realize the importance of really knowing iconic figures in history more than the popular accounts about them. This becomes of extreme importance in the case of

(Response Paper) Discourse in Art: Beyond Interpretation, Form, and Content

In response to: “Against Interpretation,” an essay by Susan Sontag A response paper for my Advanced Film Theory and Criticism class The way writer Susan Sontag used the word “interpretation” in this reading prompted me to dig deeper into the application of the word in film criticism and art as a whole. I would say I don’t agree with her when she said that art, especially at this time and age, should not be interpreted. She specifically raised how "commentary about art"

(Response Paper) Pauline Kael’s Journey to the Two Sides of the Spectrum

In response to: “Replying to Listeners” in the book "I Lost It at the Movies" by Pauline Kael and the blog post “Trash and Art: Critics on/of Pauline Kael” by Jim Emerson in the RogerEbert.com blog "Scanners with Jim Emerson" A response paper for my Advanced Film Theory and Criticism class Pauline Kael (1919 to 2001), is a household name in American film criticism, as well as a familiar name cited when looking for film books for academic use, as far as

An Epiphany: Philippine cinema’s powerful Pinays + more female presence in film studies, books, and academic endeavors

I remember a press screening I attended, then film critic friend Philbert Ortiz-Dy made me realize one very interesting, one very important thing. It was a 360-degree turn on my impression of how women are in Philippine cinema and other media professions. Phil agreed on how gender equality should seriously be addressed in the U.S. Woman filmmakers and film workers, even the most famous actresses included, don't get equal treatment in Hollywood from opportunities to talent fees. Then, he told me that

A Mother’s Day 2019 musing

Happy Mother’s Day! The fulfillment is indescribable regardless of all the challenges including those in a society that doesn’t fully understand, help, and support the importance of family, children, and parenthood. I just read this article via social media and it sums up the struggles that women, whether with or without children, have to contend with as members of the filmmaking workforce: https://www.latimes.com/entertainment/tv/la-ca-working-moms-hollywood-20190510-story.html I personally experienced having to disappear for 1.5 hour for an extended lunch in between a shoot to pump

Born Out of Love: Career and motherhood

I read this social media post: Motherhood Is Not a Woman's Most Important Job: It's more like an unpaid volunteer position you commit to for life My two cents here... Some people tend to say, the best kind of work you can get is working with your passion and not treating your work as a job. As mentioned in this article, motherhood, a very fulfilling and miraculous experience one can have, is not a job and a mother doesn’t get paid for

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