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‘In Her Shoes’ Film Review: More than just a chick flick

This movie is an interestingly profound and complex story about different relationships: familial, friendly, romantic. "In Her Shoes" features a decently textured narrative about the reconnection of two estranged sisters who have nothing in common but their shoe sizes. Offering enough depth, the story is not just about a simple issue on sibling rivalry made into a rushed script. It becomes more than a show-off of Hollywood stars ramping fashion clothes and blobbing about some insensible girl talks. This chick flick, based on

‘Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire’ Film Review: Dark, adolescent Potter film

This film adaptation of J.K. Rowling's fourth "Harry Potter" book is fantastically darker and more mature than its predecessors. Darker, a little more mature, and a little less magical, “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire” primarily deals with rejection and hormones as Harry and his friends struggle through transition from childhood to young adulthood. This motion picture focuses on the Hogwarts students in the seemingly awkward stage of their youth. The film’s look is less ostentatious than the previous installments. This time,

‘The Pacifier’ Film Review: Pacifying the action into comedy

Vin Diesel stars as the big wholesome guy in this Disney family flick. "The Pacifier" utilizes that same old tale about a tough guy tasked to take care of a bunch of rebellious kids. Flawed as it is, this feel-good movie still delivers an easy, goodwill charm for its target audience. Although this light and glossy motion picture is a completely recycled piece, it promotes more than a couple of laughs, most of which are reminiscent of the "Home Alone" stints. It tries to

‘Kingdom of Heaven’ Film Review: War and religion

Ridley Scott makes another epic — this time, streamlined in the middle of the conflicting religious beliefs of the Christians and the Muslims. A fiction inspired by historical accounts, "Kingdom of Heaven" renders a cinematic vision of the Crusades of the 12th Century. Balian (Orlando Bloom), the young, grieving blacksmith from a small village in France, finally yields to the invitation of his estranged father, Baron Godfrey of Ibelin (Liam Neeson), to go to the Holy Land of Jerusalem. With the hope of relieving

Blu-ray Review: ‘The Blob’ (1958)

The 1958 cult classic "The Blob" arrives on a single-disc Blu-ray package featuring an alien invasion story set in a small American town. Considered as one of the most successful monster-horror romps of the 1950s, this campy flick directed by Irvin S. Yeaworth Jr. transcended the schlock sci-fi, horror, and teen delinquency genres of the decade. Since then, it has endured as an iconic piece of American cinema. It stars Steve McQueen, Aneta Corsaut, Earl Rowe, Olin Howland, and Stephen

‘The Hangover’ Film Review: Hanging over a guy flick

It's a guilty pleasure comedy. Who knew a hangover could be this fun? In terms of concept and plot, this guy flick about a bachelor party gone wrong is nothing special; but the simplest reason for its comedic success is the fact that it achieves a rare balance between character and vulgarity in its storytelling. There is a sort of perverse brilliance, or maybe brilliant perversity, thrown by the characters against the gambling streets of Las Vegas. Director Todd Phillips ("Starsky and

‘The Hangover Part III’ Film Review: Hanging expectations

There are some moments to treasure, but Todd Phillips' "The Hangover Part III" mainly becomes less a comedy and more a contract obligation. In trying to be different from its predecessors, the backbone story of this third installment breaks away from the pattern that made the first film a surprise hit, which actually has its share of ups and downs. With no wedding, no bachelor party, and no drug-induced amnesia to offer in its basic premise, it avoids becoming a genetic

‘Inside Out’ Film Review: Happy + Sad

“Inside Out” is a powerfully moving animated piece exploring the importance of emotions in people's lives. Daring to explore the existential crises of the human mind and the feelings affecting one’s life, this formidably ingenious film works similar to a thesis or research project. With a material that strikes as a reflection on the power of emotions, it targets the family audience, particularly those with ages ranging from pre-teen to adult. Packaged as a motion picture set inside someone's head and how

‘Into the Blue’ Film Review: Soaking deep into the blue

"Into the Blue" is sizzling hot with bikini bodies and uncompromising Caribbean sceneries -- but that's about it. "Into the Blue" runs out of air with its contrived plot and its mere interest on showcasing sexy bodies on screen. This Hollywood flick sinks aimlessly into the deep waters of the Bahamas. The treasure isn't priced well. It’s long soaked and buried deep into the blue. Director John Stockwell seems primarily concerned with the superficial side: showcasing the major characters in a bikini fashion

Blu-ray Review: ‘Day of the Falcon’

Coming out on a single-disc Blu-ray package, the action-adventure drama "Day of the Falcon," originally titled “Black Gold” for the international market, features a soaring epic that centers on two rival kingdoms' bloody war during the dawn of the oil boom in the Middle East. Exploring the themes of love, honor, greed, family pride, betrayal, and traditions, it follows the story of star-crossed lovers whose families get caught up in a reignited conflict after the discovery of oil between their territories. This

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