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(Response Paper) Cinema as an Invention, Art, and Idealistic Phenomenon with Andre Bazin

In response to: “The Myth of Total Cinema” from the book “What is Cinema?” by Andre Bazin A response paper for my Advanced Film Theory and Criticism class The Andre Bazin reading “The Myth of Total Cinema” from his book “What is Cinema?” focused on the desire of humans to find a representation of reality as complete as possible, rooted from the innovations in cinema, by discussing techniques of mechanical reproduction of reality. This started in the nineteenth century, then carefully moved on

(Response Paper) Sigfreid Kracauer’s Photographic Reality, Cinematic Illusion, and Everything Else in Between

In response to: “Sigfried Kracauer: From Theory of Film – Basic Concepts” from the book “Film Theory and Criticism: Introductory Readings” by Leo Braudy and Marshall Cohen A response paper for my Advanced Film Theory and Criticism class In this reading entitled “Sigfried Kracauer: From Theory of Film – Basic Concepts” from the book “Film Theory and Criticism: Introductory Readings” by Leo Braudy and Marshall Cohen, realist film theorist Sigfried Kracauer highlighted the crucial role of photography in the development of moving picture.

‘The Red Balloon’ Short Film Critique: Relationship and Poetry Through a Child’s Gaze

A short essay for my Film Theory and Criticism Class The 1956 French short film classic “The Red Balloon” (Le ballon rouge) features a tender drama with a fine touch of flight of fancy. Its subdued setting features a lot of grays, suggesting the depressing quality of the film’s mood and tone, which is then contrasted with the blazing red balloon in mid air.  This post-war motion-picture classic written and directed by Albert Lamorisse features a seemingly cynical world that turns magical

‘Hedgehog in the Fog’ Short Film Critique: The Phantasm of Venturing Into the Unknown

A short essay for my Film Theory and Criticism Class The 1975 short animated film “Hedgehog in the Fog” (Yozhik v tumane) by Yuri Norstein offers an amalgam of terror and pleasure using the phantasm of venturing into the unknown. This evocative work of imagination features the journey of a hedgehog one evening to see his bear cub friend. As he travels in the foggy forest, he encounters many scary things that eventually become transformative moments of wonder. This 11-minute Russian

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