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‘The Wolverine’ Film Review: The Contemplative Adamantium

"The Wolverine" is a fairly solid standalone offering that redeems itself from the significantly weaker "X-Men" spin-off "X-Men Origins: Wolverine." Somber and restrained, this film presents a refreshing noir reboot for the franchise. Compared to other "X-Men" blockbuster movies, it utilizes a contemplative tone and a deliberately slower pace, while clearly managing to keep the momentum for another brewing sequel. Interestingly, this dark and slow-moving character study doesn't feel much like a summer superhero movie, which isn't actually a bad thing.

Blu-ray Review: ‘The Great Gatsby’ (1974)

Releasing on a single-disc Blu-ray package, the 1974 film "The Great Gatsby" serves as the third adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald's 1925 classic novel about a handsome and enigmatic millionaire betrayed by the American Dream. The book's first film rendition was a silent movie from 1926, just a year after its publication. A second remake came out in 1949. A TV movie released in 2000 became the fourth adaptation. The fifth version is already set for a 2013 theatrical release. For

‘Star Trek’ (2009) Film Review: Warpspeed wow!

Something old reboots as a glorious new. Reinventing a classic sci-fi series is prone to becoming victimized by the blackhole of franchise re-openings, but what this new "Star Trek" presents is a flaring shine of a supernova from start to end. The plot may be preposterous, but the way the film is constructed provides a genuinely rollicking adventure - a fine escapist entertainment that has just validated the tagline, "Live long and prosper." From the first stunning visuals of a pre-Enterprise time

‘King Kong’ (2005) Film Review: A Beastly adventure

This Peter Jackson film pays homage to the original 1933 "King Kong" and actress Fay Wray. "King Kong" proves to be an enduring part of cinema history and legacy. The franchise, even after more than eight decades, still continues to inspire and live up to the legacy of high-end escapist cinema. For this Peter Jackson screen adaptation of the monstrous adventure flick, it exemplifies a sort of personal expressiveness and cinematic mysticism in its storytelling. It maintains itself among the ranks of the world’s charming adventure

‘The Legend of Zorro’ Film Review: The Dela Vega heroes

"The Legend of Zorro" tones down a bit by fronting the more human issues about family relationships in its storytelling, as compared to the visually purist, action-filled premise driving the storyline for such an action genre offering. Yet, this follow-up to “The Mask of Zorro” doesn't lose its own touch of valuable action and playful camera work. The pompous stunts, grand production design, and outstanding cinematography often keep the spectators' eyes nailed to what happens next. The film captures the audience right from

‘Batman Begins’ Film Review: A great beginning for the Dark Knight

This "Batman" film goes back to the roots of the character — portraying a confused and angry Bruce Wayne who rises to redeem himself and defend Gotham. ”Batman Begins” explores the origins of Bruce Wayne's (Christian Bale) emergence as Batman and brings back the essence of what drives him to be who he is. Human emotions as love, fear and anger begin a new face for the Dark Knight as a cinematic and yet realistic film. This makes his character more human than

‘Charlie and the Chocolate Factory’ Film Review: A chocolific, expressionistic confectionery

Director Tim Burton breathes new life to Roald Dahl's 1964 sweet tale and turns it into a new celluloid confectionery. "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" is a gothic yet colorful fantasy filled with the eccentricity only Burton gets to achieve in the Hollywood mainstream. Burton is undeniably a patron of German Expressionism with the film's pale make-up, weird props, sets and costumes, exaggerated moves, and out-of-this world characterizations. He creates a dream world inspired by some dark and cartoony elements. The

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